Cleanup Underway for Lake Crescent-Highway 101 Project

  • Sat Aug 10th, 2019 3:37pm
  • News
Vehicles headed down Fairholme Hill on Lake Crescent-Highway 101. [Photo Courtesy FHWA]

Vehicles headed down Fairholme Hill on Lake Crescent-Highway 101. [Photo Courtesy FHWA]

Crews will be finishing clean up work throughout the 12-mile work zone next week but will not require traffic delays. The remaining project work will begin in mid-September and involves restoring the roadway width in front of the rock wall near milepost 229.

The work was delayed to avoid impacts on summer traffic because it requires four-hour delays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Mondays through Thursdays. Outside the four-hour delays, drivers should expect flaggers and delays for alternating single-lane traffic. Temporary traffic signals will be in place after work hours and on weekends.

This work is currently expected to begin the week of Sept. 9 or Sept. 16 and last four to six weeks. The public will be notified as soon as the contractor’s start date is confirmed.

Travelers to and from the western side of the peninsula can use State Route 112/113 as an alternate route during the delays. For traffic information in real-time check the WSDOT Traffic Alert website at https://www.wsdot.wa.gov/traffic/trafficalerts/.

This is the final season of the three-year road rehabilitation project. Completed work for 2019 includes guardrail replacement, paving the final 2-1/2” wearing surface, striping, and sign replacement.

Drivers can find updates with current project information and alerts on the park website at go.nps.gov/LCHwy101Project and the Federal Highway Administration website at https://flh.fhwa.dot.gov/projects/wa/lake-crescent/. This project is being managed collaboratively by the Federal Highway Administration and the National Park Service.

The road along Lake Crescent’s south shore was built in the early 1920s, replacing ferry passage across the lake. Today the road is part of U.S. Highway 101 and remains a vital transportation link and popular sightseeing route for visitors to the Lake Crescent area and the Olympic Peninsula. In 2015, over 420,000 vehicles traveled this road.